Steilacoom Waterfront

Monday, April 19, 2010

Today my wife and I picked up my Mom as we do most Mondays. After going out to breakfast and taking care of some running around we took a drive to the nearby town of Steilacoom. It's an older town situated on a hill above Puget Sound. There are some quaint old shops, numerous historic homes, and down at the water a ferry terminal. One of the ferries runs from Steilacoom to McNeil Island Penitentiary. These railroad tracks run along the waterfront and carry both freight trains and Amtrak passenger trains. I'll post more shots from Steilacoom over the next couple of days.

13 comments

  1. T. Becque Says:

    Nice composition with the curves of the tracks leading you back! You are in a beautiful area!

  2. lewi14 Says:

    Wonderful shot, indeed. You've chosen a perfect angle.

  3. Hilda Says:

    Having a nearby state penitentiary, even if it's on an island, sounds scary. But historic homes? I will enjoy a trip like that!

    This is a lovely composition. It feels like the trains that belong here are those big, old steam engines.

  4. I suppose I have to add it to my list of places to go!

  5. Abraham Says:

    I must say, Don and Krise, that almost all of your photographs have a quality about them that just isn't there in 90% of the photos I see that other people take and post on their blogs. There are only one or two that even come close and mine are not among those. I don't mind telling anybody that my photos, even with the best cameras and lenses I can afford to buy, just don't have that "snap" in color, especially color, and clarity (a separate slider in Photoshop is "clarity") that is found in your photos.

    It isn't in your black and white photos. That all disappears. And your black and white don't look any better than mine or any of the others. But it is your color that knocks my socks off.

    I can direct you to someone whose black and white is as stunning as your color is.

    When you get there use the images of Mexico City link.

    http://www.blogger.com/profile/17449642029639198244

    Use this link when you get there:

    Photo Carraol Images of Mexico City

    She has black and white photography sewn up. There isn't a soul that I know of who is blogging that does black and white as good as Carraol does.

    And it is only now and then that I find a photographer whose color is as good as your color photos, period.

  6. Wow! great raves from Abraham!!
    I do like this shot. It has all kinds of elements--a little bit of this--a little bit of that. It's wonderful. It tells a story. MB

  7. Isn't it too close to the water's edge? Doesn't it flood? Cool shot - I like the angle from the tracks!

  8. Yolanda Says:

    I like the "S" curve of the track, and this town looks so quaint and happy! Love how the tracks take me there!

  9. Lois Says:

    Beautifully composed picture! I like the name of this place.

  10. Jacob Says:

    It was the name that caught my attention at first, "Steilacoom." Must mean something - probably an Indian name?

    Looks like a lovely place, and your photo is very well done--excellent composition, exposure and color!

  11. T.Becque: Thank you. I wouldn't trade the northwest.

    lewi14: I'm just glad there wasn't a train coming at the time. ;-)

    Hilda: Well I didn't bring back any shots of the old homes but hopefully you'll like the other shots I post.

    Abraham: Wow, I hardly know what to say. I always try to post a quality image, but most I consider "fair at best." Your compliment is much appreciated. Also I am familiar with the blog you mentioned. It really is amazing what she does with black and white.

    Jacob: Yep, you nailed it. There are many indian names here.

    A big thanks to the rest of you too!

  12. brian stout Says:

    i've been visiting this week, but not always commenting =) feels like there are so many things to do and so little time in the day at times =) i am checking in though, and this is an awesome train track shot!!

  13. AB Says:

    Great composition

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